Buying a Haunted House: Everything You Need to Know About Buying a Spooky New Home

Is the idea of sharing a brand new home with its previous tenants a deal-breaker? Most people would never consider this, but for the superstitious out there who are looking for real estate it's a very valid question. Some houses come with ghastly reputations and unexplained phenomena, but is that a good thing or a bad thing? Here are some ideas to consider when looking at a haunted house:

What Level of Haunted is too Much for the Perfect Home?

Purchasing a haunted house is only bad for people who are afraid of things that go bump in the night. In fact, many buyers are perfectly okay with living in a home that has been known to fall on the supernatural spectrum. But what happens to people who love the property, but not the reputation? The first thing to do is some research. The seller is obviously the first person to ask, but they will probably be biased, so move onto the neighbours and ask their opinions. Online research will provide a good idea of how well known the story is and whether it's well established or a more recent rumour. Finding the answers to these questions will help a buyer decide whether the eeriness level of the property is within an acceptable range.

Be Prepared for Year-Round Visitors

Haunted houses, just like celebrities, can have their own groupies. Homes that are notoriously known to be haunted have online followings among people who don't want to live in these places, but still want to pay them a visit. Buying a haunted house, even if it is only known locally, comes with the risk of unwanted visitors stopping by, especially in the month of October. Nobody should buy a haunted house unless they are okay with the occasional tourist knocking on their door or group of teenagers sneaking around the property for scares on Halloween. The one benefit is that all these unwanted guests should be very easy to scare away.

Use the Ghosts as Leverage for a Great Deal

If a home with a ghostly reputation has been sitting on the market for a while, there's a good chance that the history of the property has frightened off its fair share of perspective buyers. This is the perfect opportunity to leverage Casper's otherworldly presence to negotiate a better deal on the property. A shrewd seller may actually use the house's notoriety to try and drive up the price, hoping to hit pay dirt with a buyer who is so intrigued by the idea of living with spirits that they are willing to pay a little extra. Some haunted houses, especially ones with particularly gruesome histories, sit on the market for a long time. It's very important to know that a haunted house not selling may have absolutely nothing to do with its reputation and could be the result of a serious flaw with the property or construction. Of course a crafty seller would use the grizzly past of a house as a reason for it not selling, which is why a qualified real estate professional should always be consulted before pulling the trigger and buying a haunted house.


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